K - Word List

ka'at

English: idiot
Bahasa Malaysia: bahlol


ka'i

English: a quarrel
Bahasa Malaysia: kelahi


kaas

English: coarse
Bahasa Malaysia: kasar


kaas polai

English: extremely coarse
Bahasa Malaysia: sangat kasar


kabank

English: a tropical tree known scientifically as shorea macrophylla - The seeds from the tree contain vegetable fat that can be used to make butter.
Bahasa Malaysia: engkabang


kabint

English: to piggy back
Bahasa Malaysia: pikul di belakang


kabuo’

English: to finish
Bahasa Malaysia: menghabiskan


kada

English: a bat
Bahasa Malaysia: kelawar


kada ngiliwat

English: a flying fox
Bahasa Malaysia: keluang


kadi

English: to take off
Bahasa Malaysia: tanggal


kadis tari

English: a praying mantis
Bahasa Malaysia: mentadak


kaduomp

English: close eye
Bahasa Malaysia: pejam mata


kajont dio'

English: Wait!
Bahasa Malaysia: Tunggu dulu


kajuog

English: to raise
Bahasa Malaysia: dirikan


kakak

English: a crow
Bahasa Malaysia: gagak


kaki

English: where
Bahasa Malaysia: kemana


kaki neh?

English: Where are you going?
Bahasa Malaysia: pergi mana?


kala'

English: a fruit with flesh like the avocado called litsea garciae vidal
Bahasa Malaysia: engkala


kalieh

English: to dig
Bahasa Malaysia: gali


kalik

English: to find
Bahasa Malaysia: cari


kaloh

English: thin
Bahasa Malaysia: nipis


kaloh kotak

English: very sparse
Bahasa Malaysia: sangat nipis


kandank kando'

English: panic
Bahasa Malaysia: menggelabah


kangon

English: to choke
Bahasa Malaysia: tercekik


kank

English: a small squirrel species
Bahasa Malaysia: tupai jenis kecil


kapak

English: an ax
Bahasa Malaysia: kapak


kapok

English: a ceiba tree which bear fruits that has as silky cotton fibre which locals used as pillow stuffings
Bahasa Malaysia: kekabu


karu'

English: to stir
Bahasa Malaysia: kacau


kasah

English: a large rattan mat - This mat is usually used to dry paddy or pepper with the rough side up. When it is used as a mat, the smoother side is on the upside. Due to its durable material, the kasah can last many, many years and sometimes passed down as an heirloom to an offspring. It was also used as a casket when the owner died before coffins were common place.
Bahasa Malaysia: tikar kelasah


kasig

English: to chase away
Bahasa Malaysia: halau


kati' kanih

English: here and there
Bahasa Malaysia: di merata tempat


katod

English: to shorten
Bahasa Malaysia: pendekkan


kau'

English: a fermented fish delicacy - Also referred to as kau’ pingolih (for salt water fish), this is a very unique Bau Bidayuh’s dish and no other group of people on planet Earth prepares fish this way. The ingredients include as many fresh water fish as possible to fit in a typical jar or gobuk and preferably bony fish, some sea salt, rice powder and leaves from a thorny plant commonly found in Borneo forests. The fish is treated with ground sea salt to remove excess moisture and unwanted odor. Then, all the salted fish are put into the gobuk. Leaves are put on top of the fish to prevent flies from laying their eggs on them or worms from getting into the meat before sealing the gobuk. Some people use tapioca leaves or poyank leaves but others use a thorny creeper's leaves called bikolamp. After three or four days, the dehydration process to preserve the flesh is complete. The fish is taken out to spread rice powder evenly on and inside the fish. It is then put into a gobuk for the next process which is fermentation. The gobuk for the dehydration and the frementation process is usually sealed with an airtight cover made of layers of buant leaves on top of layers of manah leaves which are then tied shut with strips made of the barks of the boyuh tree. The manah leaves work well to cool the fish and help in the preservation and fermentation processes. Today, it would be a tin cover with a layer of plastic in between to prevent leakage but leaves are still preferred. The fermentation period takes approximately about 30 days and once fermented, the kau’ can be kept for many years. The longer it is preserved the better because even the bones are soft and to Bau Bidayuh, this makes it very delicious to eat. Today kau' is a rare delicacy due to the dwindling supply of suitable freshwater fish which used to populate the many Borneo rivers that are now either too polluted or over-fished.
Bahasa Malaysia: pekasam ikan


kaya raja

English: very rich
Bahasa Malaysia: kaya raya


keh

English: question tag - is it?
Bahasa Malaysia: kah


kibalot

English: to put in
Bahasa Malaysia: masukkan


kibangoh

English: to heat up
Bahasa Malaysia: memanaskan


kibuk

English: quietly
Bahasa Malaysia: dengan senyap


kijat

English: a lightning bolt
Bahasa Malaysia: kilat


kilambu

English: rainy season
Bahasa Malaysia: landas


kilin

English: to see
Bahasa Malaysia: nampak


kilowonk kiliyuos

English: Damn
Bahasa Malaysia: Celaka


kimaran

English: a rice storage jar
Bahasa Malaysia: tempayan beras


kimotol

English: to shiver
Bahasa Malaysia: menggigil


kimotol pimubuoh

English: shivering all over
Bahasa Malaysia: sangat menggeletar


kinaman

English: a wound
Bahasa Malaysia: luka


kining

English: clear
Bahasa Malaysia: cerah


kiow

English: a mynah
Bahasa Malaysia: tiong


kiow toki'

English: a common mynah
Bahasa Malaysia: burung tiong makan tahi


kiraki

English: a frog
Bahasa Malaysia: sejenis katak


kirapot

English: not yet full
Bahasa Malaysia: separuh


kiropa'

English: an armpit
Bahasa Malaysia: ketiak


kirosiep

English: a long-legged frog
Bahasa Malaysia: katak


kirotas

English: paper
Bahasa Malaysia: kertas


kiruank

English: a single piece
Bahasa Malaysia: sebiji


kirusi

English: a chair
Bahasa Malaysia: kerusi


kitak kitak

English: to flutter
Bahasa Malaysia: meronta-ronta


kitupat

English: a glutinuous rice dumpling
Bahasa Malaysia: kuih chang


kiyad

English: an ape
Bahasa Malaysia: beruk


ko'ih

English: us, not including the person you are talking to
Bahasa Malaysia: kami


ko'is

English: dirty
Bahasa Malaysia: kotor


ko'is kobos

English: filthy
Bahasa Malaysia: sangat kotor


ko'ot

English: tight
Bahasa Malaysia: ketat


kobos mutuob

English: total extinction
Bahasa Malaysia: habis kepupusan


kobos nisot

English: to die an insane death
Bahasa Malaysia: mati gila


kobos pongguot

English: curses
Bahasa Malaysia: cilaka


kod

English: a cough
Bahasa Malaysia: batuk


koda'

English: like
Bahasa Malaysia: macam


kodak

English: to disturb
Bahasa Malaysia: ganggu


kodit

English: short
Bahasa Malaysia: pendek


kodit titit

English: very short
Bahasa Malaysia: sangat pendek


kodo'

English: short
Bahasa Malaysia: pendek


kodok

English: to smell
Bahasa Malaysia: menghidu


kojit

English: ear
Bahasa Malaysia: telinga


kol

English: a lump
Bahasa Malaysia: ketulan


kolap

English: a sandfly
Bahasa Malaysia: rengit


kombant

English: a convertible roof for a window or door of a traditional Bidayuh hut - It is raised like a hatchback door and kept in place with a piece of wood or bamboo during the day and taken down at night.
Bahasa Malaysia: sejenis atap yang boleh di angkat untuk dibuka


kombant bak ka’os

English: a convertible roof for the back window of a Bidayuh hut
Bahasa Malaysia: atap mudah tukar untuk tingkap belakang


kombant bukut

English: a convertible roof for the left and right side window of a large size Bidayuh hut
Bahasa Malaysia: atap mudah tukar untuk tinkap kiri dan kanan


kombant tonju’

English: convertible roof for the front door
Bahasa Malaysia: atap mudah tukar untuk pintu depan


kombing

English: a goat
Bahasa Malaysia: kambing


kombuok

English: a frog
Bahasa Malaysia: sejenis katak


kombut

English: to forget
Bahasa Malaysia: lupa


kona'

English: nice
Bahasa Malaysia: baik


kondad

English: a tadpole
Bahasa Malaysia: berudu


kondank

English: magpie
Bahasa Malaysia: murai


konk

English: a can
Bahasa Malaysia: bekas tin


konyap

English: to collect
Bahasa Malaysia: kumpul


konyat

English: habit
Bahasa Malaysia: tabiat


kood

English: a bitter taste
Bahasa Malaysia: pahit


kopog

English: to cut
Bahasa Malaysia: putuskan


koruh

English: murky
Bahasa Malaysia: keruh


koruh kuad

English: very murky
Bahasa Malaysia: sangat keroh


koruob

English: a knee
Bahasa Malaysia: lutut


kos

English: to turn
Bahasa Malaysia: belok


kosi’ konyi

English: all smiling
Bahasa Malaysia: tersenyum riang


kosuonk

English: a dog
Bahasa Malaysia: anjing


kotak kotuok

English: mess around
Bahasa Malaysia: kacau bilau


kotiek

English: rapid
Bahasa Malaysia: cepat


koto

English: martial art without any weapon
Bahasa Malaysia: silat


kowok

English: tired
Bahasa Malaysia: letih


koyuh

English: a piece of wood
Bahasa Malaysia: kayu


koyuh oguonk

English: gong sticks - They are made by cutting a sago stem to the required size..
Bahasa Malaysia: pemukul gong


koyuh pijobat

English: drum sticks - They are used to beat the Bidayuh drum called pijobat.
Bahasa Malaysia: pemukul gendang


koyuh sanang

English: gong sticks - These are used to beat the small gongs called sanang. They are made of the rachis of sago leaves
Bahasa Malaysia: pemukul canang


Krokuonk

English: Krokong
Bahasa Malaysia: Pekan Krokong


ku'ut

English: to bite
Bahasa Malaysia: gigit


kuab

English: to yawn
Bahasa Malaysia: menguap


kubab

English: hip
Bahasa Malaysia: punggung


kubie'

English: to be dented
Bahasa Malaysia: kemek


kubunt kubunt

English: crowded
Bahasa Malaysia: sesak


kuda

English: a horse
Bahasa Malaysia: kuda


kuda bilitik

English: zebra
Bahasa Malaysia: kuda belang


kudu

English: how many
Bahasa Malaysia: berapa


kudu roga noh?

English: How much is that?
Bahasa Malaysia: Berapa harga yang itu?


kuduk

English: a yam
Bahasa Malaysia: keladi


kuduos

English: a vegetable
Bahasa Malaysia: sayur


kujiet

English: to pinch
Bahasa Malaysia: cubit


kulat

English: a mushroom
Bahasa Malaysia: kulat


kulit

English: skin
Bahasa Malaysia: kulit


kumbiek

English: skewed
Bahasa Malaysia: miring


kumbiet

English: to look back
Bahasa Malaysia: menoleh


kumbuk

English: to gargle
Bahasa Malaysia: cuci mulut


kungank

English: to wipe behind after toilet use
Bahasa Malaysia: membersih dengan alat selepas buang air besar


kunyong

English: a nun
Bahasa Malaysia: biarawati


kuob

English: to close
Bahasa Malaysia: tutup


kupak

English: to peel
Bahasa Malaysia: kupas


kupang

English: a thigh
Bahasa Malaysia: paha


kupiah

English: a Bidayuh priestess headgear
Bahasa Malaysia: topi


kupuo'

English: a village
Bahasa Malaysia: kampung


Kupuo' Apar

English: a Bidayuh village in the Singgai area of Bau - It is not to be confused with the Jagoi village of Opar.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Apar


Kupuo' Batu Spit

English: the village of Batu Spit in Bau, Malaysia - The village is located a few minutes away from the old bazaar of Krokong on the way from Bau. Halfway between the village and Krokong is a rocky outcrop that has been blasted by bombs to make way for the road but the opening is still narrow. The word narrow in Malay is 'sempit' which the Bidayuhs pronounce as 'supit'. So, when they named the village after this narrow gap, it is called Batu Supit or Spit (in actual speech). The first inhabitants were actually from Piros, an older village closer to Mount Tra’an where the first Bidayuh settlement was located in Krokong.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Batu Spit


Kupuo' Bijongon

English: a bidayuh village in the Krokong area of Bau - It used to be known as Buta' which is also the word for blind but the elders thought of giving it a nicer name based on the words 'jongon' meaning bright and they agreed on Bijongon. The inhabitants are all descendants of people who used to dwell along with their siblings in the original Blinggink village or bowank along the Pidie' River. The village is located on Punggu Buta or Buta Hill not far from the old longhouse. There is very limited space for expansion on top of the hill and as demands for more dwellings increased, a number of families have returned to build their houses near the old longhouse and is now becoming a new village. The primary occupation of the villagers is still farming with many employed by SALCRA but some like their ancestors are good at building houses and would often find employment at construction sites in towns. Their children go to St. Patrick primary school in Krokong and continue their secondary education at Lake secondary school in Bau. These people are predominantly Catholic and they are members of the St. Patrick's Catholic church in Krokong.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Bijongon


Kupuo' Bijuray

English: a Bidayuh village in the Krokong District of Bau - Most of the inhabitants were originally from the hill settlement of Monggag who left it because of road inaccessibility and danger of landslides. They were joined by their relatives from other villages nearby to form this new settlement and like them, they are all descendants of the Bidayuhs from Blinggink. It is called Bijuray because the word translates as 'working together' to show unity and it was officially opened by the former Prime Minister of Malaysia, Dr. Mahathir Mohammad. The people are mostly Catholics and Seventh Day Adventists and each have their own church not far from the village. They are predominantly farmers by profession with some working for the oil palm plantation owned by SALCRA. Some have opened up their own business there helping provide employment for their relatives. Their children join their cousins from Kidowont to go to school at SK Pedaun Bawah.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Bijuray


Kupuo' Blinggink

English: a Bidayuh village in the Krokong area of Bau - It is erroneously recorded as Belimbing in official documents. The ancestors of the present day inhabitants came from Bung Bratak in the Jagoi area of Bau and finally built a longhouse along the Pidie' River not far from the present location. After three devastating fires that destroyed their longhouse, many of the people relocated to the site near the meeting of the Goru' and Minyowan rivers. Many families decided on separate dwellings instead of rebuilding a longhouse. As a result, in the 1970's there was only one longhouse which had only three family units in it housing the former headman and his children while surrounded by his people in a number of single family dwellings. Some other families moved further away and built other settlements. Those that remain near the old longhouse built their houses on a hill nearby. Some people claim that the name comes from the word bilingieng (shiny) while another says it is a plant named linggink which used to be in abundance near the riverbank of Pidie' river nearby. Today, the short longhouse of the 1970's has either separated into single family dwellings or their inhabitants moved away to build another settlement. The people are mostly farmers with a few government servants and a handful running their own business. Many are members of the St. Patrick's Catholic church in Krokong while a number of families belong to the Seventh Day Adventist church near the village. There is a surau in the village which serves a few Moslem families there. There are also still quite a number of villagers who want to continue their ancestor's pagan practices and this effort was lead by the former Sarawak assistant minister, the late Dr. Patau Rubis, a Bidayuh from this village. He was the founder and first president of State Reform Party (STAR). Just before his demise, he built a small baruk or head-house in his residence in the village.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Blingging


Kupuo' Bogag

English: a Bidayuh village in the Bau Jagoi area - They were one of the groups that left Tibowang Souh after the old village burnt down to the ground and resettled in this new place.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Bogak


Kupuo' Bokah

English: the Bidayuh village of Bokah in Bau, Malaysia - The word bokah in Bidayuh Jagoi means a creeper
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Bokah


Kupuo' Bowank

English: the village of Bowang in Bau, Malaysia - The name of the village comes from the word 'tibowank' which means a vacant Bidayuh village. Its inhabitants left the settlement to settle in other parts of Bau after it was burnt down not too long ago. A new village that stands there today took the official name of Tembawang Sauh which in Bidayuh is Tibowank Souh or 'burnt old village'.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Tembawang Sauh


Kupuo' Dorod Jagoi

English: Mount Jagoi Village - It was one of the first Bidayuh dwellings in Bau just like Bung Bratak. There is only one inhabitant left in the village which is located not far from the summit of the mountain after most of the inhabitants moved closer to the road in the valley below. It is now a Bidayuh heritage site and the whole mountain area is declared a park where visitors can climb and enjoy the view as well as study the flora and fauna of the region.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Gunung Jagoi


Kupuo' Duyuoh

English: the village of Duyoh in Bau, Malaysia - They were one of the last groups that left Jagoi Dorod village to find a new place to settle. Today the Duyoh village is found at the foot of the southern side of the Jagoi mountain. The entrance of the Bung Jagoi Heritage Center which is located in the old Jagoi Dorod village can be accessed via this village.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Duyoh


Kupuo' Groguo'

English: a Bidayuh village not far from Bau town - Not far from Mount Orad, the villagers are descendants of Panglima Kurow, the famous Bidayuh warrior who left Bung Bratak after it was destroyed by marauding enemies. He used Mount Orad as a shelter until hostilities ceased. His followers built settlements nearby including Groguo’ which is located on a hill like many typical Bidayuh villages of the early years. Today, the village can no longer accomodate more houses and many have settled down the hill and even started a new settlement of Sibuluh.
Bahasa Malaysia: Grogo


Kupuo' Gumbank

English: a remote Bidayuh village located in the upper reaches of Pidie' River - This group of people along with those from Tilingguos and Padank Pan migrated from a village on the other side of the Bengoh Mountain Range. Some are said to have come from Indonesia to join their relatives there. They speak the Biatah dialect called Maan. Not too long ago, the Krokong Bidayuh villagers downstream viewed them as rather primitive and alien due to limited contact. With the advent of good road accessibility, more contacts among them have somehow diminished this perception and they were accepted as equal to the other Bidayuhs. Besides, the road brings many utilities and facilities to help improve their lives. Today, they can speak both the Maan and the Jagoi dialects.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Gumbang


Kupuo' Jugant

English: a Bidayuh village in the Jagoi area of Bau, Malaysia - It is a settlement not far from Tibowang Souh, one of the earliest Bidayuh village in Bau and is also home for the first Bidayuh woman Olympian, Pandalela Rinong who won a bronze medal for Malaysia in 2012 Olympics in London.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Jugan


Kupuo' Kaman

English: a Bidayuh village in the Krokong district of Bau, Sarawak - The villagers of this settlement came from Blinggink. One of the original settlers had the aspiration of becoming the new headman of Blinggink when the post was left vacant but was denied by his fellow villagers. He managed to persuade a number of families to move with him to a new settlement called Minyowan but the government considered it as a pelamam or farm dwelling and was still part of Blinggink. However, as soon as the number of dwellings reached the minimum requirement of 20, the authorities granted it the status of a village with its own headman. The majority of the inhabitants belong to the Seventh Day Adventist church unlike their relatives in Blinggink who are mostly Catholics or pagans. They now have their own church built near the village. Their young children go to St. Patrick's primary school in Krokong while the older ones go to Lake Secondary school near Bau. Most of the people farm their own land while a few are employed by the government.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Kaman


Kupuo' Kidowon

English: a Bidayuh village in the Krokong District of Bau - Most of the villagers were originally from Blinggink. Used to be known as Balunk Kidowont, there are now two settlements in this village where one is called Kidowont Atas which is located on top of a hill. Some of the inhabitants have moved down next to the Pidie' River and they are called Kidowont Bawah. The name of the village comes from the word dowont which translates as a leaf. The people who live here are mostly farmers. Their children go to Pedaun Bawah Primary School and may continue on to Lake Secondary School, Bau.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Pedaun


Kupuo' Monggag

English: a Bidayuh village in the Krokong District of Bau - Most of the villagers were originally from Blinggink. It is located on top of a hill and a school called Pedaun Bawah Primary School was built for the village. Like the fate of their relatives in Buta or Bijongon who chose to build on a small hill, expansion of the village was very limited. Soil erosion and landslides has forced most of the inhabitants to move down hill to join their relatives from other nearby villages to a new settlement called Bijuray which is more accessible by road. Only the primary school remain visible on the hill and in operation but a recent landslide has threatened to move the school down the hill as well.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Monggag


Kupuo' Opar

English: a Bidayuh village in the Jagoi area of Bau - This village is a popular tourist attraction famous for its traditional headhouse or baruk and the Gawia Sowa' (harvest festival). Opar used to be the largest Bidayuh settlement before being outpaced by Tongang.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Opar


Kupuo' Padank Pan

English: a remote Bidayuh village located near the Bengoh Mountain Range - This group of people along with those from Tilingguos and Gumbang migrated from a village on the other side of the Bengoh. They speak the Biatah dialect called Maan. Not too long ago, the Bidayuhs downstream viewed them as rather primitive and alien due to limited contact. With the advent of good road accessibility, more contacts among them have somehow created better inter-relationships.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Padang Pan


Kupuo' Pinomu

English: the Bidayuh village of Pinomu in Bau, Malaysia - This is a new settlement started by former inhabitants of Duyoh.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Pinomu


Kupuo' Piros

English: the village of Piros in Bau, Malaysia - One of the villages that started out of a mountain settlement Mount Tra’an in Krokong. The inhabitants were reported to be the last ones to move out of the mountain village to settle closer down in the valley via Sipanyut settlement. The village is sometimes referred to by the older generation of Krokong villagers as Kupuo' Dorod which literally means the mountain village or Kupuo Romin. Some of the inhabitants later moved out to form a village called Batu Spit. A group of new Roman Catholic converts found that they could no longer the pagan rituals moved out and built the settlement called Kupuo Pisa’ today.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Peros


Kupuo' Pisa'

English: the village of Pisa’ in Bau, Malaysia - The inhabitants of this settlement were originally from the mountain village or Kupuo' Dorod or Piros, one of the early settlements of Bidayuhs in the Krokong area. The village took its name from the small bamboo which in Bidayuh is pisa'. The inhabitants built this village after they became Roman Catholics and found themselves at odds with the traditional belief of their ancestors.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Pisa


Kupuo' Podamp

English: a Bidayuh village in the Serembu area of Bau
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampong Podam


Kupuo' Prasuont

English: an early Bidayuh settlement in Krokong - All the inhabitants had left the area to build their homes in villages down in the valley.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Prasuon


Kupuo' Puak

English: the village of Puak in Bau, Malaysia - The inhabitants of this settlement were originally from the mountain village or Kupuo' Dorod, the early settlement of Bidayuhs in the Krokong area. The village took its name from a small river nearby.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Puak


Kupuo' Rabak Rotan

English: a Bidayuh village in Krokong - It was originally part of the old Silingguos village which split into three settlements including Silingguos Nyian and Silingguos Bong.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Rabak Rotan


Kupuo' Rasow

English: the Bidayuh village of Rasow in Bau, Malaysia
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Rasau


Kupuo' Sibobog

English: the village of Sibobog in Bau, Malaysia - The people of this village were originally one of the groups that left Kupuo' Jagoi Dorod to find a new place to settle.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Sibobok


Kupuo' Sibuluh

English: the Bidayuh village of Sibuluh in Bau, Malaysia - The first inhabitants were from Kupuo’ Groguo’ about a few kilometers down the road which were unable to accomodate anymore expansion of houses on their small hill. As a result, Kupuo’ Sibuluh is built on lower and flatter ground which can fit more dwellings and even a school called Groguo’ Primary School.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Sibuluh


Kupuo' Silampit

English: a Bidayuh village in the Jagoi area of Bau, Malaysia
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Selampit


Kupuo' Silasot

English: a Bidayuh village in bau district - It is named by its founding fathers from a fruit called 'lasot' which is the lansium domesticum variety known in Malay as 'langsat'. It is now one of the biggest Jagoi villages in Bau after Tongang and Opar. They were one of the groups that left Tibowang Souh after the old village burnt down to the ground and resettled in this new place.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampong Serasot


Kupuo' Silikint

English: A well-known Bidayuh village in Bau District. Silikint is a border settlement not far from the Indonesian line where hundreds from all over Malaysia come every Friday to Sunday to buy a variety of items from the weekend bazaar such as clothing and accessories, hats, footwear, antiques, rattan mats and furniture, souvenirs, exotic food and even market produce from Indonesia. The village has become quite prosperous as a result of this international trade both through legal and clandestine means.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Serikin


Kupuo' Silingguos Bong

English: a Bidayuh village in Krokong - It is actually an extension of the old Silingguous which has split into three villages namely, Silingguos Nyian, Rabak Rotan and Silingguous Bong.
Bahasa Malaysia: Tringgus Bong


Kupuo' Silingguos Nyian

English: a remote Bidayuh village located in the upper reaches of Pidie' River - This group of people along with those from Gumbank and Padang Pan migrated from a village on the other side of the Bengoh Mountain Range. They speak the Biatah dialect called Maan. Not too long ago, the Krokong Bidayuh villagers downstream viewed them as rather primitive and alien due to limited contact. With the advent of good road accessibility, more contacts among them have somehow diminished this perception and they are
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Tringgus Nyian


Kupuo' Silu'

English: the Bidayuh village of Siluk in Bau, Malaysia
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Siluk


Kupuo' Sipadah

English: a Bidayuh village in the Jagoi area of Bau, Malaysia - It is located next door to Tongang
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Sipadah


Kupuo' Skibank

English: the Bidayuh village of Skibang in Bau, Malaysia - The Skibang villagers were originally from Silasot who left to look for a better livelihood.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Skibang


Kupuo' Staas

English: the village of Staas in Bau, Malaysia - They were one of the groups that left Kupuo Jagoi Dorod to find a new place to settle. According to locals, there were many ironwood or taas in the area. So, the founding fathers decided to name the village 'Sitaas' where 'si' means the one who is and taas after the wood which today is pronounced as just Staas. There used to be an ironwood left standing at the entrance to the village to remind people of its origin.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Staas


Kupuo' Stukur

English: the Bidayuh village of Stungkor in Bau, Malaysia
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Stungkor


Kupuo' Stum Muda

English: the Bidayuh village of Stum Muda in Bau, Malaysia
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Stum Muda


Kupuo' Suba Bandar

English: a Bidayuh village of Suba in Bau, Malaysia - The people of this village were reported to be former inhabitants of Groguo' who set out to look for more land to cultivate and founded Suba Romin. The villagers began to work on the land surrounding the village and would go up or motak to the galanks or shelters they built on their farm or umoh. They would only come down or moli' to the village for the weekends to get supplies and for the Christians, to go to church. These farm dwellings became more permanent and as the numbers grew, they were referred to as Bitoyaks. Over time, these Bitoyaks grew and were recognized by the authorities as separate villages with their own headman. One of these villages is Suba Bandar.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Suba Bandar


Kupuo' Suba Buant

English: a Bidayuh village of Suba in Bau, Malaysia - The people of this village were reported to be former inhabitants of Groguo' who set out to look for more land to cultivate and founded Suba Romin. The villagers began to work on the land surrounding the village and would go up or motak to the galanks or shelters they built on their farm or umoh. They would only come down or moli' to the village for the weekends to get supplies and for the Christians, to go to church. These farm dwellings became more permanent and as the numbers grew, they were referred to as Bitoyaks. Over time, these Bitoyaks grew and were recognized by the authorities as separate villages with their own headman. One is called Suba Bandar and this one is called Suba Buan. It has its own primary school called SK Suba Buan and despite its small size, it is recognized by the government as one of the model rural schools for the district. The main challenge for the villagers is that the Pidie' River often overflows its banks and floods the low lying areas of the village cutting it off from the main road.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Suba Buan


Kupuo' Suba Romin

English: a Bidayuh village of Suba in Bau, Malaysia - The people of this village were reported to be former inhabitants of Groguo' who set out to look for more land to cultivate and founded Suba Romin. The villagers began to work on the land surrounding the village and would go up or motak to the galanks or shelters they built on their farm or umoh. They would only come down or moli' to the village for the weekends to get supplies and for the Christians, to go to church. These farm dwellings became more permanent and as the numbers grew, they were referred to as Bitoyaks. Over time, these Bitoyaks grew and were recognized by the authorities as separate villages with their own headman called Suba Buan and Suba Bandar.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Suba Bau


Kupuo' Tongang

English: a Bidayuh village in the Jagoi area of Bau, Malaysia - It is the largest Bidayuh settlement to date.
Bahasa Malaysia: Stengang


kupuonk

English: a waist
Bahasa Malaysia: pinggang


Kupuo’ Senaan

English: the village of Senaan in Bau, Malaysia - The inhabitants of this new settlement were originally from Kupuo' Bijongon on the hill nearby. The village took its name from a rapid in the river of Aank Pidie’ upstream from the settlement.
Bahasa Malaysia: Kampung Senaan


Kushink

English: Kuching
Bahasa Malaysia: Kuching


kutunk

English: to share
Bahasa Malaysia: kongsi


kuwe'

English: a baby
Bahasa Malaysia: bayi


kuwiet

English: to peel
Bahasa Malaysia: kupas


kuyonk

English: a lipstick
Bahasa Malaysia: lipstik


kuyuk

English: a puppy
Bahasa Malaysia: anak anjing


kuyuoh

English: a crab
Bahasa Malaysia: ketam